Blind Cricket New South Wales

Blind Cricket New South Wales

1/73 Wentworth Avenue, Wentworthville NSW 2145

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The History of Blind Cricket

The game has its beginnings in 1922 in Melbourne, Victoria where it was first played at a hostel in Prahran. At the time of a Test Match two residents thought blind people could play cricket as well, and put rocks in a tin can and began to play a crude version of what we play today. The game was then introduced to other States in Australia (including NSW) and was mainly played during lunchtime at workshops where vision impaired people were employed.

In 1928 in Sydney, the first Interstate game took place between NSW and Victoria. Later the same year, a NSW team travelled to Melbourne to continue the challenge.

In January 1953, the Australian Blind Cricket Council was formed in conjunction with the inaugural Australian Blind Cricket Carnival (Championships) which were held in Kooyong in Melbourne.

Canterbury Visually Impaired Cricket Club History

The club was formed in May 1980. The newly formed club travelled in and around Sydney and Rural areas of NSW promoting Blind Cricket. In doing so, the club built up a strong friendship support base with the RSL and other sighted clubs.

The Achievements of The Canterbury VICC

The Canterbury VICC was one of the original foundation members of Blind Cricket NSW, along with Newcastle Blind Cricket Club. This was soon to be followed by both, the Cumberland and the Nepean Clubs. And later to be joined by the Burwood team. A competition Shield was enthusiastically developed between all the clubs. Canterbury went on to win 5 Premierships in the Association. Canterbury notes it best achievement, as been the introduction of the current cricket rules that are now been played and fully adopted throughout Australia Blind Cricket teams. Canterbury formed a rules committee to enable Visually Impaired players the opportunity to play cricket as close as possible to conventional cricket rules.

This was devise by a dedicated group of players and officials. Canterbury trialed the rules with success and began to play the rules on a permanent basis. Over the next 5 years The Canterbury Club began to promote the new rules to the other states, beginning with a tour to South Australia. Then the Canterbury team invited the Queensland Blind Cricket Association to a match under the newly formed rules. Finally a match was arranged against the NSW association. By this time the new game was dubbed The Canterbury Rules.

Throughout the club years the team produced 3 NSW Captains, also some players that were selected for the Australian BCC Eleven. One player also been selected to play in the world cup in India. We are also pleased to recognize that one of our officials had been awarded the OAM for his services to Blind Cricket, and who was also made one of the first governors of the ABCC. The Canterbury VICC are proud to wear the club colours of Green and Gold.

This was presented at our recent AGM held at Shirley House, Burwood 2006. And was accepted by all present. Yours In Cricket Glenn W. Siddins

History of the Cumberland Club

The club was formed in 1983 and commenced playing in the Association competition in the 1983/84 season.

Cumberland's entry increased the number of teams in the competition from 3 to 4 (NSW, Sydney, and Newcastle being the other 3).

I was assisted by Steve McLeod and Bill Jolly in forming the club.

Motivations for forming the club were to:

-Cater for an increase in players in the Sydney region, especially western Sydney. Playing numbers at the time had the potential to exceed the numbers needed for the two existing Sydney based teams; and

-Try and take the focus away from the still simmering tensions between the NSW and Sydney clubs.

The club's home ground was at the North Rocks Deaf and Blind school.

Apart from Steve, Bill and me, other players in that first season were Wayne and Malcolm Simpson, Andrew Scheidat, Peter Tatterson, Paul Birmingham, Geoff Chapman, Patrick Hughes, Ian Waller, David Aveyard, Steven Gregson, and Christo Sarantakis.

Laurie Chamberlain and Jeff Kesby were recruited to the club during that first season to assist with umpiring and scoring.

The club's playing strength was tested by the departure of both Steve McLeod and Bill Jolly (returned to Melbourne) after the 1983/84 season. Although they were boosted by Merv Hine, Charlie McConnell, and Rick Gumbleton who all had one season stints with the club.

Despite finishing in 4th position in each of its first three seasons, the club still had some memorable victories. One that sticks out is a win over the Sydney club at North Rocks in the 1985/86 season, with an excellent totally (now B1) batting effort playing a large part in the victory.

The club finished third in 1986/87 and as I recall narrowly missed out on finishing second which would have seen the club play against the Sydney club in the competition final.

Christo and Wayne were the first players developed by the club to achieve state team selection, for the 1986/87 interstate championships played in Melbourne.

Following the loss of several players at the end of the 1986/87 season, a major recruitment effort saw Cameron and Vaughan Roles, Troy King, and Murray Elbourne join the club in the 1987/88 season.

Writen by Peter Gunton Cumberland cricket club first captain.

Burwood Club

The game of Blind Cricket in NSW is administered and controlled at a State level by Blind Cricket NSW and at a National level by the Australian Blind Cricket Council (A.B.C.C.).

Blind Cricket NSW and the Australian Blind Cricket Council both exist to foster, administer and promote a world class sport and provide a competitive and recreational activity for persons with a vision impairment at a domestic, national and international level.

History

The game had its beginnings in 1922 in Melbourne, Victoria where it was first played at a hostel in Prahran, a suburb of Melbourne. At the time of a Test Match, two residents thought blind people could play cricket as well, and put rocks in a tin can and began to play a crude version of what we play today. The game was then introduced to other States in Australia (including NSW) and was mainly played during lunchtime at workshops where vision impaired people were employed.

In 1928 in Sydney, the first Interstate game of blind cricket took place between NSW and Victoria. Later the same year, a NSW team traveled to Melbourne to continue the challenge.

From this, the NSW Blind Cricket Club was formed in 1928.

In January 1953, the Australian Blind Cricket Council was formed in conjunction with the inaugural Australian Blind Cricket Carnival (Championships) which were held at Kooyong in Melbourne. The NSW Blind Cricket sent a team to participate in this Carnival.

Australian Blind Cricket Carnivals (Championships) are conducted bi-annually and are held in State rotation around Australia.

NSW Blind Cricket Club

The NSW Blind Cricket Club operated from 1928 through until the 1982 and was primarily responsible for fostering, administering and promoting the game of Blind Cricket in NSW.

Blind Cricket NSW

In 1982 the NSW Blind Cricket Association was established and is responsible for fostering, administering and promoting the game of Blind Cricket in NSW. In 2007, the name was changed to Blind Cricket NSW.

Three clubs were the original affiliated members of the new Association, these clubs were the Burwood Blind Cricket Club (formally the NSW Blind Cricket Club), Canterbury Blind Cricket Club (formally the Sydney Blind Cricket Club) and the Newcastle Blind Cricket Club. In the late 1983, the Cumberland Blind Cricket Club (now known as the Hills Blind Cricket Club) joined the Association.

Currently, there are only two teams playing in the Associations domestic competition (Burwood & Hills) and the cricket season is conducted from September/October through to March/April each cricket season at our home ground at Henley Park, Enfield (adjacent to Vision Australia).

Currently, Blind Cricket NSW conducts a Development program for junior players. These juniors are promoted into the domestic competition when they achieve a suitable standard and skill level.

Every two years Blind Cricket NSW is responsible for selecting, funding and sending a side to the bi-annual Australian Blind Cricket Championships played throughout Australia. This is the blind equivalent of the old Sheffield Shield or as it is known now, the Purra Cup.

Written by Graham Coulton; founding member of Burwood

History of the Blind Cricket Ball

The cane blind cricket balls were the first balls to be used in Australia from the mid 1920's through until 1972.

Then the red nylon blind cricket ball was used from 1972 to 1974 only.

The black nylon blind cricket ball has been in use since 1974 until the end of the 2002/2003 season.

The white nylon blind cricket ball was made especially for New Zealand in the early 1990's. This colour ball was found to be unsuitable for our game and therefore, the black ball was preferred in New Zealand as well as Australia.

(the cane and nylon balls are both hand woven around a wire frame and have lead for weight and bottle tops for sound placed inside)

A hard white plastic ball is currently used in Australia and it is slightly larger and has holes in it so sound can be released from the bottle tops and led weight. This ball has been in use since the beginning of the 2003/2004 season.

A small white solid plastic blind cricket ball with small metal pieces inside is presently used in India and a majority of the Sub Continent countries and this was the ball used during the first and second World Cups for Blind Cricket played in India during November 1998 & December 2002. The World Blind Cricket Council has investigated the option of adopting a new ball, which has still not been accepted by all participating countries through out the world.

 
 

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